What I am Drinking this Festive Season (with bonus recipe!)

Anyone who knows me IRL knows that I adore Christmas. I love the food, picking out gifts, the lights, and feeling like snow is pretty rather than distressing. #CanadianProblems.

As the only alcohol-snob in my family, I insist upon selecting the drinks for the day. Here are my picks for Christmas 2016:

First of the Day 

(Because, really, being a childless adult over the holidays is all about drinking all the drinks without judgement.)

fullers

Fuller’s 2016 Bottle Conditioned Limited Edition Vintage Ale

It’s a personal tradition of mine to enjoy a bottle of Fuller’s Vintage every Christmas. I’m intrigued by beers that should be aged and served at cellar temperature. Last year, I made the mistake of purchasing only one bottle, which I drank with my partner the day of dear Lord baby Jesus’  birth.

To really enjoy Fuller’s Limited Edition this year, I bought 4. Now hear me out on my reasoning for this extravagance. This brew is meant to be aged for 3-4 years, but I want to drink it now, dammit; and geek out over how the flavour changes over time. As well, at 500mL per bottle, it’s really just a wee taste if I share with my partner. This year, I splurged. There’s one for me, one for him, and two to age in our cellar.

Of course, by cellar I mean closet. I’m not that fancy.

Aperitif

Cynar

This mind-blowing aperitif came to my attention via the bar chef/manager at Thoroughbred Food and Drink. Pronounced CHI-narr, this is an Italian liqueur featuring over 13 herbs and plants, the most dominant being artichoke. Does that sound strange? It did to me at first, too. Cynar is Fonzy-smooth, flavourful, and isn’t overpowered by an alcohol bite. Cynar adds depth to cocktails, and alone it’s a friendly sipper. I like it straight up and room temperature, or expertly mixed by Thoroughbred’s chief bartender.

trius-wines

(If you look real close you can see me in the bottle, hee hee.)

With Dinner

To me, a formal dinner means wine. Sorry, beer, but you can be too heavy and take up too much food room in my tummy.

This year, I chose local VQA wines to have with dinner. I discovered the wines entirely by accident. The Wine Shop recently opened close to my apartment, so my partner and I checked it out while on a snowy walk.

The friendly and knowledgeable wine server offered us some samples of their Christmas features. At her suggestion, we sampled one red and one white: Trius’ anniversary Bordeaux blend, and their 2015 barrel-fermented Chardonnay. We went home with both wines for our Christmas celebrations.

Trius Red the Icon: Anniversary Bordeaux Blend (2014)

French wine, especially Bordeaux, makes my heart and taste buds sing. I think it is exciting how French grapes have the potential to work in Canada, as we are a cold and wet country with a large Maritime region. Of course, there are a lot of issues with wine growing and making in Canada, but that is a different post for a different day.

A Bordeaux blend uses the main grapes of the region, consisting of mainly Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, and Merlot. It also includes smaller components of Malbec and Petit Verdot.

Trius’s anniversary take on Bordeaux blend is dominated by Cabernet Franc, with ripe black and blue fruit and cracked pepper notes. There’s also undertones of sweet smoke and cocoa. Although colour isn’t a huge factor in the quality of the wine, the ruby red of this wine is gorgeous. With this flavour profile, and pretty bottle to impress the non-drinkers, I was sold. I can’t wait to uncork this with my in-laws, who favour red meats for Christmas dinner.

Trius Barrel-Fermented Chardonnay (2015)

With the white wine drinkers, I will be sharing Trius’ Barrel-Fermented Chardonnay from 2015. New world Chardonnay usually scares me. It typically sees too much oak, making it flabby, obnoxious, and boring. I didn’t have a lot of hope for this wine, and I am surprised by how much I enjoy it.

This Chardonnay has seen some oak in the form of new French barrels. It isn’t overdone. There is a vanilla, warm butter, and clove aspect to this wine, but it’s rounded out by tropical fruit and lees contact. The acid was just right – it evened out the oak, and left a clean finish on my palate. Surprise, surprise: it’s not a life-changing wine, but it’s a wine that made me smile.

Coffee Cocktail

Another personal tradition of mine is to make a coffee/eggnog cocktail for my partner’s parents. It’s a small thank-you for the delicious meal they make me. For serious, my father-in-law could be a gourmet chef. Too bad he’s a banker!

This year, with two jobs and the attempts at writing, I sadly won’t have time to make this drink. But as a bonus for you, dear reader, here is my most requested Christmas batch cocktail recipe for your enjoyment!

  • 1 Small pot of cold, strong coffee (roughly 4 mug’s worth, unflavoured dark roasts are best)
  • 1 Cup EggNog (if you hate eggnog, cream and high-fat milk works just as well.)
  • 5 oz Bailey’s
  • 3 oz Chambord (If Chambord is out of your budget any raspberry liqueur will work.)
  • Ice
  • Raspberries and sugar for garnish

Brew the coffee, add eggnog and let cool. Once cold, gently stir in Bailey’s and Chambord. After stirring, I use a funnel to pour into a bottle for transportation. I just use a dollar store bottle with a flip top, the kind that stone-oven pizza places use. Shake as needed, depending on the brand of eggnog or the fat content of the dairy it may separate. As long as the dairy isn’t expired, it’s fine.

For the garnish, take raspberries and dip in sugar.

To serve, pour over ice. You can float the sugared raspberries or use a skewer. If you don’t have fancy reusable skewers or disposable skewers, toothpicks are a solid substitute.

This is a very forgiving recipe. Meaning that if you accidentally use too much or too little of one ingredient, don’t worry! Taste and adjust the ratios to your own palate.

Happy drinking this holidays!

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